Week Ending November 1, 2021

Curing Hepatitis C Improves Cognitive Function and Quality of Life
“Successful treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) led to improvement in cognitive function in people with and without liver cirrhosis, according to study results published in the European Journal of Neurology.”

Hepatitis C and the liver: Effects and biopsy
“Hepatitis C can lead to cirrhosis, liver disease, or liver cancer if a person does not seek treatment. A liver biopsy can tell doctors how badly the liver is damaged and help them prescribe treatments to manage the condition.”

Lower protein activity after hepatitis C therapy may signal path to healing scarred liver
“MUSC researchers report in the Journal of Viral Hepatitis1 that the activity levels of the proteins involved in liver scarring, or cirrhosis, begin to decrease immediately after treatment for the hepatitis C virus (HCV), suggesting the possibility of early healing.”

Sustained investment is needed to eliminate hepatitis C by 2030
“A new national report released today highlights a decline in hepatitis C testing and treatment uptake, putting Australia at risk of not achieving its target of eliminating hepatitis C as a public health threat by 2030.”

HCV treatment decreases protein activity levels involved in liver cirrhosis, research shows
“Researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) report in the Journal of Viral Hepatitis that the activity levels of the proteins involved in liver scarring, or cirrhosis, begin to decrease immediately after treatment for the hepatitis C virus (HCV), suggesting the possibility of early healing.”

Hepatitis C: Disability benefits
“Hepatitis C spreads through contact with the blood of a person with the virus. The condition causes inflammation of the liver. In severe cases, it can lead to cirrhosis and chronic hepatitis, which may leave an individual unable to work or earn income. In this case, they may be eligible for disability benefits.”

Liver cancer screening: Detecting a ‘silent’ condition
“Liver cancer is difficult to detect in early stages because it causes few symptoms. For this reason, it’s known as a “silent” condition, according to Dr. Fasiha Kanwal, professor of medicine and section chief of gastroenterology and hepatology at Baylor College of Medicine.”

Telehealth for hepatitis C treatment: Report launch and findings from a national qualitative study
“This forum presents findings from a study on the use of telehealth for hepatitis C treatment during the COVID-19 pandemic. Conducted by researchers at the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society, and funded by the Australian Government Department of Health, this qualitative interview-based project aimed to understand the benefits, limitations, and effects of the use of telehealth for hepatitis C treatment during the COVID-19 pandemic.”