The Caring Ambassadors Program uses a unique approach in our work to address the elimination of viral hepatitis and specifically hepatitis C.

Our three main methods to combat hepatitis C are to Empower patients and providers to increase their knowledge of hepatitis C to improve access a cure; to Educate systems and communities on how to integrate viral hepatitis services into existing programming; and to Advocate on behalf of patients and communities to create sound policy, funding and messaging. We are honored to serve the community to help eliminate the largest infectious disease outbreak of our time; we promise to be BOLD in our approach to creating paths to health and making hepatitis C history.

The time is now. 71 million people worldwide are living with chronic Hepatitis C right now. It is the largest chronic infectious disease outbreak of our time…and it’s curable. Talk to your doctor about treatment for your Hepatitis C, and don’t take no for an answer.

MY CHOICES© is a tool to help you recognize and act upon what you can control in your health care journey to achieve optimal healing, regardless of the illness you face. It contains elements of a guide book, health planner, journal, and activity book to help orient you to and plan for the journey ahead.

Order Educational Materials

Free brochures and materials

Order Educational Materials. Caring Ambassadors Program believes that knowledge is power. We strive to empower patients, systems and communities to increase their knowledge of hepatitis C in effort to eliminate the largest infectious disease outbreak of our time. 

Weekly News Update.
Caring Ambassadors Program provides 3 weekly news updates covering Lung Cancer News, Hepatitis C News, and My Choices© Update. Receive them delivered weekly to your inbox.

Weekly News Update

Hepatitis C News
Week Ending August 2, 2021

Dr Omar Massoud Explains Why Early Testing for Hepatitis C Is Important
“Early testing and treatment for Hepatitis C could help 71 million people worldwide living with the disease. It will also help prevent long-term health issues such as liver disease and cancer, says an expert at a top American hospital, Cleveland Clinic, ahead of World Hepatitis Day on July 28.”

The Epidemic No One Is Talking About
“The COVID-19 pandemic has caused a number of downstream impacts, but the increase in hepatitis C cases is not one that gets as much attention as mental or heart health. But the isolation wrought by the pandemic has increased drug use and hepatitis C transmission while reducing testing and treatment.”

Hepatitis C Infections Are On The Rise Amid The Pandemic. Half Of Infected People Don’t Know They Have It.
“Hepatitis C rates are increasing exponentially, according to the latest Centers for Disease Control data, and new infections are expected to rise due to a falloff of prevention, testing and treatment during the pandemic.”

“Hepatitis can’t wait” – WHO commemorates World Hepatitis Day 2021
“Today, WHO joins the global community in celebrating World Hepatitis Day with the theme “Hepatitis can’t wait”, calling on all countries to work together to eliminate viral hepatitis as a public health threat by 2030. A hepatitis-free future is achievable with a united effort.”

Hepatitis C: What is it, symptoms and how do you get it
“Hepatitis C is a blood borne virus that can infect the liver and if left untreated may cause serious and potentially life-threatening damage to the liver.”

We Can End Hepatitis C. Why Aren’t We? | Opinion
“This year, roughly 14,000 Americans will die from hepatitis C, an infectious disease that can be cured by a simple pill in a matter of weeks.”

Woman shares her story of surviving hepatitis C to shatter stigma, encourage others to get tested
“I was feeling, like, tired and just not my normal self, and so I went to my primary physician, and he took blood work and sure enough, he found out I had the hepatitis C,” she recalled.”

Hepatitis C, alcohol, and alcoholic hepatitis
“Hepatitis refers to inflammation of the liver. Several things can lead to the condition — one major cause is hepatitis C, which can result from a viral infection. Another is alcohol consumption, which can cause alcoholic hepatitis.”

NASCAR driver promotes Hepatitis C testing
“NASCAR driver Will Rodgers had his own battle with hepatitis at a young age and is now making it his mission to remove stigma and provide access to care.”

My Choices© Update
Week Ending August 2, 2021

Improving Air Quality Reduces Dementia Risk, Multiple Studies Suggest
“Improving air quality may improve cognitive function and reduce dementia risk, according to several studies reported today at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference® (AAIC®) 2021 in Denver and virtually.”

7 ways to prevent type 2 diabetes
“People with risk factors associated with type 2 diabetes can take steps to prevent the onset of the condition. These risk factors include prediabetes, a condition in which blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough for a diabetes diagnosis.”

Secret Side Effects of Taking Apple Cider Vinegar, Says Science
“Even if you haven’t been down the rabbit hole of nutrition trends, you’ve likely heard about how people have been consuming apple cider vinegar for its health benefits.”

How Long Does It Really Take to Make Healthy Eating and Exercise a Habit?
“While it’s no surprise that humans are creatures of habit, research shows that as much as 45% of people’s behaviors happen on repeat each and every day, and often in the same location and around the same time. Your morning coffee? That’s a habit. Binge-watching Netflix to fall asleep each night? That’s a habit too. For some people, waking up at 5:30 every morning to work out for an hour is a habit.”

Kimchi, kombucha and kefir: What are the facts on fermented foods?
“Given the long history of fermented foods — fermentation was a biological method of food preservation long before we had refrigeration or preservatives — it can seem a bit surprising that fermented foods are currently so trendy.”

Lifestyle and brain health are interconnected
“Most of us know the importance of exercise and healthy eating habits to promote heart health, but do you know that nutrition and lifestyle also impact the health of your brain? It is never too late to incorporate healthy habits into your daily life to protect your brain. The national Alzheimer’s Association recommends ten ways to help take care of your brain.”

VIDEO
A Neurologist Makes the Case for Integrative Medicine

Qigong.

“Qigong is quite literally “Moving Meditation”. As with all meditation practices, Qigong has an incredibly calming effect on the central nervous system. As the mind, breath, and body are connected to the moment, the parasympathetic nervous system is engaged and the brain releases all sorts of feel-good hormones, such as serotonin and dopamine.”
https://theecohub.ca/5-healing-benefits-of-qigong/

Try session 3 of Qigong with Sifu Larry Wong

Click here to view on vimeo
Would you like to try session 2?
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Join the World Hepatitis Day Movement!

We can’t wait for the pandemic to end to get hepatitis elimination back on track!

Hepatitis Can't wait awareness poster

CDC Releases 2019 Hepatitis Numbers – We are on the wrong road to elimination!

Today, CDC published online the 2019 Viral Hepatitis Surveillance Report for hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C. This report now includes demographic characteristics of persons with chronic hepatitis B and chronic hepatitis C, including age, sex, race/ethnicity, urbanicity, and US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) regions.

National Hepatitis Testing Day Proclamation

The White House

BRIEFING ROOM

 A Proclamation on National Hepatitis Testing Day, 2021

MAY 18, 2021   •    PRESIDENTIAL ACTIONS

Our efforts to combat the COVID-19 pandemic over the past year have reinforced many public health lessons, including the importance of communication, community engagement, and a comprehensive testing strategy to reduce the spread of infection. These same lessons hold true for another epidemic affecting our Nation: the silent epidemic of viral hepatitis. Viral hepatitis is a serious, preventable public health threat that puts people who are infected at increased risk for serious disease and death. When left undiagnosed and untreated, hepatitis B and hepatitis C can cause liver cirrhosis, liver cancer, and even early death. Hepatitis D, which occurs only among individuals infected with hepatitis B, can also cause serious liver disease.

On this National Hepatitis Testing Day, I call on all Americans who are at risk for hepatitis to get tested, and for all health care providers to educate their patients about viral hepatitis.

Our Nation has set a goal to eliminate viral hepatitis by 2030. Thanks to Federal investment in medical research, we have the technology and tools to provide safe and effective hepatitis vaccines and therapeutics that can reduce mortality and even lead to a cure. Despite this progress, an estimated 2.4 million Americans are living with hepatitis C, and more than 860,000 are living with hepatitis B — many of whom unknowingly suffer its effects.

Approximately 200,000 Americans are infected with hepatitis D every year. Infection with hepatitis D in an individual already infected with hepatitis B — known as superinfection — leads to a more rapid progression towards liver cancer. We must increase prevention, testing, and awareness to provide people the life-saving treatment they need. Because of the Affordable Care Act, most health insurance plans must cover hepatitis B and hepatitis C testing with no cost-sharing.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends screening and testing for hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and hepatitis D based on risk, health status, and pregnancy. It is important we implement these recommendations to ensure proper treatment and help stop the spread of hepatitis. For more information on the recommendations, visit cdc.gov/hepatitis.

My Administration is committed to addressing the health disparities and health inequities, which, as with so many health metrics, are also seen with viral hepatitis. Viral hepatitis disproportionately impacts Black and brown Americans, Indigenous persons, Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders. The interplay of factors such as poverty, inadequate housing and transportation, food insecurity, access to care, access to addiction treatment and mental health care, medical mistrust, language and cultural barriers, stigma, and discrimination must be addressed if we are to eliminate these health disparities and advance health equity. The recently released Viral Hepatitis National Strategic Plan: A Roadmap to Elimination is focused on making sure more people living with viral hepatitis are tested and aware of their status and providing a roadmap for quality care and treatment. To read more about the plan, visit hhs.gov/hepatitis.

The viral hepatitis epidemic is also linked with other public health threats, including HIV, sexually transmitted infections, and opioid use. Our response to the public health challenges of viral hepatitis, HIV, sexually transmitted infections, and substance use disorders will require a focus on the people and places where these risk factors intersect, and doing more to test people for viral hepatitis and other infections. We also need to scale-up vaccinations, testing, and care in settings where people at risk receive other services. Implementing point-of-care testing in outreach settings, utilizing clinical decision support tools, and increasing provider awareness and training for implementing testing recommendations will help improve diagnoses and awareness. The ability to reduce viral hepatitis infections will depend on integrated strategies and a comprehensive approach to address our ongoing challenges.

Viral hepatitis exacts a significant toll on our Nation’s health, and the stigma and discrimination associated with the disease further impair the quality of life among those affected. Today, we reaffirm our commitment to ensuring everyone knows their viral hepatitis status, has access to high quality care and treatment, and lives free from stigma and discrimination.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, JOSEPH R. BIDEN JR., President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim May 19, 2021, as National Hepatitis Testing Day. I encourage all Americans to join in activities that will increase awareness about viral hepatitis and increase viral hepatitis testing.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eighteenth day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand twenty-one, and of the Independence of the United States

of America the two hundred and forty-fifth.

 

JOSEPH R. BIDEN JR.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/presidential-actions/2021/05/18/a-proclamation-on-national-hepatitis-testing-day-2021/

COVID-19 and Liver Disease

CDC Releases 2025 Strategic Plan

CDC Releases 2025 Strategic Plan for preventing and controlling viral hepatitis in the United States. New outcome measures were identified to track national progress toward these goals. These measures are included in the second publication released today, the online 2021 National Viral Hepatitis Progress Report.

BIGG Elimination Tribute Project

The BIGG ELIMINATION TRIBUTE PROJECT is a module-based training to help establish replicable frameworks for HCV prevention & education using harm reduction strategies.

The overall goal is to build attendees’ capacity, confidence, and knowledge to integrate responsive hepatitis C (HCV) screening, testing, linkage-to-care/cure, and support programs into existing infrastructures.

Learn more about the modules here